Fracked Gas Rules!

fracked gas - Tom Shepstone reportsTom Shepstone
Natural Gas NOW

Those who labor under the illusion of having natural gas without fracking are going to be sorely disappointed; the bulk of natural gas is now fracked gas.

The word from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) today, courtesy of principal contributor Tu Tran, is definitive: Shale gas provided the largest share of US natural gas production in 2013. What a shock this is going to be for the Big Apple’s commie mayor, Bill deBlasio and New York City Treehugger Mat McDermott, who wrote this back in 2011:

My take on this is fairly simple: There are simply better ways to invest in our energy infrastructure as we transition away from fossil fuels than expanding the use of fracked natural gas. More and more the research shows that, while natural gas certainly has an important role to play in the US energy mix for some time, fracking has just too much risk involved, environmentally, socially, financially, to support it — especially in New York State.

Well, sorry, one-t Mat, but that ship has sailed. Natural gas is tracked gas today.

Here is the word on tracked gas from the EIA (emphasis added):

Total U.S. natural gas gross withdrawals reached a new high at 82 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in 2013, with shale gas wells becoming the largest source of total natural gas production. Natural gas gross withdrawals are a measure of full well stream production including all natural gas plant liquids and nonhydrocarbon gases after oil, lease condensate, and water have been removed.

According to the Natural Gas Annual, gross withdrawals from shale gas wells increased from 5 Bcf/d in 2007 to 33 Bcf/d in 2013, representing 40% of total natural gas production, and surpassing production from nonshale natural gas wells. New technology has enabled producers to shift production to resources that are now easier to reach and have lower drilling costs. These trends have been reflected in a lower market price of natural gas.

Fracked Gas

Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-895, “Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report”; Form EIA-914, “Monthly Natural Gas Production Report”; the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, and predecessor agencies; state agencies; LCI; DI; Ventyx; BENTEK Energy; and EIA estimates based on historical data.

Shale gas wells made up 8% of total natural gas produced in the United States in 2007, with 63% of shale gas production coming from Texas. Since then, the distribution of shale gas production by state has changed significantly in the United States, especially in Texas, Pennsylvania, Louisiana, and Arkansas. These states accounted for 26 Bcf/d, or 79%, of U.S shale production in 2013.

Texas shale gas production increased from 3 Bcf/d in 2007 to 11 Bcf/d in 2013. Most of its shale gas production growth came from the Barnett, Eagle Ford, and Haynesville-Bossier plays.

Pennsylvania became the second-largest shale gas producing state in 2013, producing 8 Bcf/d, with almost all the growth coming from the Marcellus play. Shale gas production from the Utica play is increasing, but this volume remains small by comparison.

Louisiana produced a minimal amount of shale gas in 2007, but it produced 4 Bcf/d in 2013. All of this growth came from the Haynesville play.

Arkansas became the fourth-largest shale gas producing state, accounting for 2.8 Bcf/d, or 9%, of U.S. shale gas production in 2013. All of its shale gas production growth came from the Fayetteville play.

Fracked Gas

Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-895, “Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report”; Form EIA-914, “Monthly Natural Gas Production Report”; the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, and predecessor agencies; state agencies; LCI; DI; Ventyx; BENTEK Energy; and EIA estimates based on historical data.

Total U.S. gross natural gas production from nonshale natural gas wells decreased by 25% from 41 Bcf/d in 2007 to 31 Bcf/d in 2013. Production from nonshale natural gas wells in Texas, Louisiana, and the Gulf of Mexico made up 56% of total U.S. gross production from nonshale natural gas wells in 2007, but their combined share has declined to 41% in 2013.

Over this period, production from nonshale natural gas wells in these states decreased by 45% to 13 Bcf/d in 2013 mostly because of natural depletion and a relatively low number of new nonshale natural gas wells in these states. Even though production from nonshale natural gas wells decreased between 2007 and 2013 on a national basis, production from nonshale natural gas wells in some states, notably Colorado, the sixth-largest natural gas producing state, increased over this period.

Bottom line: you can’t have your natural gas and frackless, too. Natural gas is likely to be tracked gas today.

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5 thoughts on “Fracked Gas Rules!

  1. Pingback: Fracked Gas Takes Over! | ShaleNOW

  2. Pingback: Fracked Gas Rules! | ShaleNOW

  3. It is not surprising to me that the article showcases the Sane Energy Project– and the folks in that group could not be any loonier. Not content with their fictitious blast zone maps for the spectra project into manhattan (which if you asked me seem to imply that specific pipe would be operating at a pressure much higher than it actually is)–they decided they were also experts on the rockaway pipeline project, port ambrose and now all of the infrackstructure (their word for pipelines) in the entire state. Considering that they were a poor source for information on the spectra pipe, could not read a very simple map depicting only two projects also in the city (williams rockaway project and national grid’s BQI), the idea that these people are running around doing teach ins and attempting to explain nearly everything from FERC to wellhead is frightening.

    Never mind that some of their key people are from Occupy who demonstrate their greatest skills are making puppets! It is astonishing just how much these nuts have been featured in all kinds of media outlets.

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