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New York Quietly Adjusts to Renewables Economic Reality

shale gas outrages - Tom Shepstone ReportsTom Shepstone
Shepstone Management Company, Inc.

 

 

Quietly – very quietly – New York State is adjusting its policies to recognize renewables economic reality, which will ultimately result in more gas use.

One of our diligent readers sent me a link a while back that I just got around to investigating in more depth. I wish I had done so earlier because it demonstrates how far removed New York State has been from renewables economic reality. A new policy is quietly being implemented that will slowly bring things back down to earth, even as Governor Corruptocrat pushes out other subsidies, wastes money on SolarCity and otherwise pursues politically correct energy policies, despite the state’s increasing natural gas use. What the new policy does is slowly move away (but not nearly fast enough) from crippling net metering incentives on which companies such as SolarCity have built their houses of cards.

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Gentry Class Elites Tell Rural America to Drop Dead

shale gas outrages - Tom Shepstone ReportsTom Shepstone
Shepstone Management Company, Inc.

 

 

Gentry class elites who finance fractivism are dismissive of rural areas and their economic needs, preferring they simply empty out and become wildernesses.

A very perceptive article in Forbes the other day by James Taylor, President of the Spark of Freedom Foundation really hit home with me. Entitled “Anti-Fracking Elitists: Rural America Should Remain Economically Stagnant,” it captured the essence of what’s happening as elitists from a few wealthy families on the coasts attempt to control the future of a rural America in-between. These are the families who fund fractivist causes and, while they claim to love rural America, they couldn’t care less about rural Americans. They’d prefer, in fact, we just leave or drop dead, rhetorically speaking.

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How to Battle Fractivists in One Easy Lesson

shale gas outrages - Tom Shepstone ReportsTom Shepstone
Shepstone Management Company, Inc.

 

 

The oil and gas industry has always been focused on production and is rather poor at fighting, but Texans for Natural Gas shows how to battle fractivists.

The oil and gas industry is notoriously bad (pipeline companies being the worst) and very slow, by tradition, in doing what is, essentially, land use politics. Likewise, most landowners who want the industry in their backyard are just too polite to do battle. Both the industry and its natural constituencies are driven by motives of being businesslike, friendly and unfailingly positive.

Unfortunately, that’s not enough in today’s world. It probably never was if we consider some the earliest political campaigns of our nation. Successful politicians know the public always says it hates negative campaigning, yet unfailingly responds to it. There are limits, of course. One hopes we don’t get back to where we refer to our opponent as a “mean-spirited, low-lived fellow, the son of a half-breed,” as Adams did of Jefferson.

Notwithstanding these boundaries, it’s completely fair to illustrate your opponents’ failings. bad policies, mistakes and weaknesses. How else are decision makers and voters to know, after all? The oil and gas industry and those of us who support it very much need to get better at this. An outfit called Texans for Natural Gas is showing the way.

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New York’s Energy Double Standards: When Home Rule Is Out

shale gas outrages - Tom Shepstone ReportsTom Shepstone
Shepstone Management Company, Inc.

 

 

New York’s energy double standards are on full display right now with a wind project off Lake Ontario. It’s home rule again but the rules have changed.

Back in December I wrote a post here about Andrew Corruptocrat Cuomo’s ridiculous plan to impose a poorly conceived renewable energy plan on rural Upstate New York. I mentioned the Lighthouse Wind project in Niagara and Orleans Counties just off the shores of Lake Ontario. It will occupy 20,000 acres of land to create roughly 200 megawatts of capacity, probably operating about one-third of time to generate a measly 65-70 megawatts of power.

I’m not against wind on principle, though. I’ve worked on wind projects, in fact. I only oppose the subsidies involved and the unfair advantages accorded wind compared to natural gas, which is a much better bargain for all. There are huge energy double standards involved when it comes to wind versus natural gas in New York and among those are the matter of home rule.

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If Government Energy Were All We Had, We’d Be in Blackout Now

shale gas outrages - Tom Shepstone ReportsTom Shepstone
Shepstone Management Company, Inc.

 

 

If government energy policies over the last four decades were all we had depended upon to heat and light our world we’d be living in blackout conditions now.

I’m not much of a fan of The Hill, whether we’re talking about Congress or the newspaper and blog, the latter being largely a gossip sheet for the former. Nevertheless, The Hill does, from time to time, publish some great stuff revealing what incredible fiascos, messes and Rube Goldberg contraptions we create when when we try to do things by committee. Such is the case with an article Thursday by Mark Mills, who is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute. It is entitled “Despite Four Decades and $500 Billion, the Energy Department Hasn’t Accomplished Much,” and, in just a few paragraphs, makes it clear government energy policy is unlikely to ever produce anything more than blackouts.

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Heinz Endowments Attack on Shale Rebuffed by Court

shale gas outrages - Tom Shepstone ReportsTom Shepstone
Shepstone Management Company, Inc.

 

 

The Heinz Endowments has led the attack of the gentry class on economic opportunity in Pennsylvania but was rebuffed by a recent Commonwealth Court decision.

Good news!

The Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court slapped down the Heinz Endowments in a decision released yesterday. No, the Heinz Endowments isn’t mentioned in the decision and the judges may not have any realized its involvement but they recognized its hucksterism when they saw it and they rejected it.

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Dead-End NY: Empire State Business and Manufacturing Blues

shale gas outrages - Tom Shepstone ReportsTom Shepstone
Shepstone Management Company, Inc.

 

 

Andrew Cuomo’s Start-Up NY program might better be called Dead-End NY for all the good it’s done; a lousy 722 jobs for a taxpayer rip-off of $59 million.

“An upstate jobs ticket to hell” was how I described Start-Up NY last year, noting it was Governor Corruptocrat’s “Rube Goldberg strategy to use other people’s money” to create upstate jobs after the NRDC gang told him he couldn’t frack. They’ve since told him he can’t allow pipelines either. Back in July, after spending tens of millions on advertising, Start-Up NY had created slightly over 400 jobs, less than half what little Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania gained by simply allowing fracking and getting out of the way.

Now, after almost another year, things appear to have gone from bad to worse, so bad in fact, Empire State Development tells us next to nothing anymore, apparently hoping lack of data will, at least, dampen bad news coverage. Unfortunately for Dead-End NY, others are noticing anyway. The journal amNewYork, for example, just did an editorial calling out Corruptocrat’s budget for now including language that ends the requirement to report job creation connected with the program. Don’t like the numbers? Just make them go away. Others still, collect data, though, and the evidence for Dead-End NY is irrefutable.

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If You’ve Lost Labour, You Can Hang It Up As A Fractivist

cost of renewables - Tom ShepstoneTom Shepstone
Natural Gas NOW

… 

If what’s happening in the UK is any indication, with a Labour candidate asking for reason when it comes to fracking, you can now hang it up as a fractivist.

Something remarkable just happened in the UK that portends the approaching end of fractivism both there and here. The UK is the midst of an election. A Labour Party parliamentary candidate for North East Derbyshire named Natascha Engel just said “spreading scare stories for which there is no reliable evidence about increases in cancer rates and low-birth-weight babies is unforgiveable” and “should have no place in the debate about energy, climate change and shale.” It’s something akin to the Flat earth Society sponsoring a “round the world” cruise and reflects a new political reality — fractivism isn’t selling anywhere outside beyond the ivory towers of the gentry class.

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Unstoppable Natural Gas: Fracking As Far As the Eye Can See

cost of renewables - Tom ShepstoneTom Shepstone
Natural Gas NOW

… 

The future belongs to unstoppable natural gas, as far as the eye can see. Yes, renewables will be part of it, too, but fracking is the primary path to power.

Thursday and Friday’s Today In Energy posts from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) together provide a big picture of our energy future. It is one of unstoppable natural gas. Fracking is here to stay. The first post, by Richard Bowers, is about how natural gas has displaced coal in the Northeast with respect to electricity generation. The second, by the EIA staff, is all about the expected decline in nuclear energy capacity and generation. Put them together and all you see is unstoppable natural gas.

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Burn Wood? This Is Environmentalism?

cost of renewables - Tom ShepstoneTom Shepstone
Natural Gas NOW

… 

Is it environmentalism to suggest we burn wood? The Alliance for Green Heat seems to think so, as it ignores the obvious CO2 benefits of using natural gas.

Earlier this week I was forwarded an e-mail suggesting I burn wood because it was “low carbon, renewable and local.” It was from a group called the Biomass Thermal Energy Council, a member of the Alliance for Green Heat. I’d never heard of either organization until then. The basic pitch was to sign up for a webinar to learn more about an innovative wood stove that could complement solar panels on someone’s property. The friend who forwarded it to me thought it richly ironic and opined that “tree-huggers may implode” at the thought they should now burn wood instead of loving it.

It was one of those laugh out loud lines for which my friend is well known, but, nevertheless, I found the e-mail quite intriguing on two fronts. First, the choice to burn wood is as rural and redneck as it gets, and being a redneck agrarian myself, I’m for it. I like cutting trees, love wood fires and grew up in a home where we had one of those old classic kitchen stoves that could burn wood. Burning wood has great nostalgic appeal to me. What really interested me, though, was how wood could be low carbon. That just didn’t seem right. So, I checked it out.

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